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HIGHLIGHTS ARCHIVE

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SAN DIEGO, Aug. 8, 2017 -- Local warriors recently attended a Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) mental health workshop in Carlsbad, California. These gatherings are often the first time warriors leave their homes to connect with others in their communities.

"I definitely underestimated post-traumatic stress, and I allowed it to control my life," said Mike Atchison, U.S. Army veteran from San Diego, California. "I lost everyone and everything I liked or loved. It left me with extreme hate, rage, fear, anger, depression, and anxiety. I abused alcohol and drugs to cope with my mixed emotions."

Through the generous support of donors, WWP offers veterans specialized mental health programs and services – tailored to each warrior's specific needs and free of charge.

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NEW YORK, Aug. 2, 2017 -- Veterans with service-related health issues received instant relief when Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) held a Benefits Claims Day at the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regional office in New York City.

"My claim was open since 2012," said Carlos Gonzalez, U.S. Army wounded warrior and local NYC resident. "Wounded Warrior Project took me to this event and put me in front of the VA representative who was going to review my claim – I had a decision the same day."

Carlos' approval came with more than $38,000 in retroactive benefits service pay the following day.

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MONTGOMERY, Ala., July 26, 2017 -- Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) veterans recently read books to kindergarten and first-grade children at Dozier and Wilson elementary schools as part of a volunteer program they created called the Warrior Reading Initiative. This group of warriors is an extension of WWP's Peer Support group based in Atlanta, Georgia, where injured veterans meet monthly to connect with one another, share personal experiences, and collaborate on coping mechanisms that can help in recovery.

Warrior-to-warrior peer support plays an important role in the healing process as it allows injured veterans to build relationships based on shared experiences. The Peer Support program is dedicated to ensuring every injured veteran, family member, and caregiver encourages one another in recovery, thus embodying the WWP logo of one warrior carrying another off the battlefield.

During the book reading, warriors, students, and school staff experienced firsthand what is possible when injured veterans are exposed to programs and services that honor and empower them.

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LOS ANGELES, July 24, 2017 -- Filmmaking brothers Mark and Jay Duplass, the creative minds behind "Togetherness," are launching "Room 104." The new HBO anthology series is set in a single motel room and tells the stories of the various guests that pass through it. To celebrate the show's release on July 28, they've teamed up with DEC Artists to raise awareness and support for Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) and the warriors it serves.

"The idea for the #DoMore104 campaign came from our belief that there is always room to do more good things for others," said Daniel Dart, DEC Artists founder. "How can we help? How can we do more? We're raising money to support the men and women of our armed forces and thank them for all they've done. Wounded Warrior Project has done a fantastic job supporting our nation's wounded veterans. And I think rallying around these wounded warriors is a cause that can unite us all."

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YPSILANTI, Mich., July 20, 2017 -- Golfers and yoga enthusiasts alike will join wounded veterans for a weekend to support Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP). At the Old Glory Golf tournament, golfers will enjoy 18 holes of play, along with auctions, raffles, food, and fellowship. This will be the fourth year event organizer and long-time WWP supporter Rich Keenan has planned the event in his community.

"Wounded Warrior Project needs the support of people in the community," Rich said. "I'm proud to continue to host this event for an organization that does so much good for so many of our nation's wounded veterans."

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SAN ANTONIO, July 12, 2017 -- One of the major challenges many wounded veterans face when returning to civilian life is maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle. That's why Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) hosts physical health and wellness events around the nation, not just to get warriors moving again but to connect them with other local warriors who share their life experiences. Recently, injured veterans challenged themselves and connected during a ruck march.

"It was definitely great to be part of, and struggle, as a team again," said Air Force veteran Jeremiah Patterson. "It doesn't sound significant, but for me it was. That camaraderie is something I miss since being out of the military."

Rucking is an exercise routine that has gained popularity in recent years, especially among veterans who have transitioned to civilian life. The fitness regimen involves marching, hiking, or running with a weighted backpack, usually with a moderate to heavy weight, and according to the Go Ruck website (http://www.goruck.com/how-to-ruck/), the ideal pace is 15 minutes per mile.

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SIMSBURY, Conn., July 8, 2017 -- The supporters of Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) come from all walks of life, and their generosity allows WWP to provide free, life-changing programs and services to injured veterans, their caregivers, and family members. Recently, Hayley Latorre of Simsbury, Connecticut, used her passions for baking and America's veterans to raise awareness for WWP.

"The bake sale was a community project that I started seven years ago," Hayley said. "However, I have involved the school to a much bigger extent in the last few years through the club I started – Wounded Veterans Strong. I decided to support Wounded Warrior Project because I was inspired by my father. And Wounded Warrior Project's mission and goals really moved me."

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URBANA, Ill., July 7, 2017 -- Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) relies on the support of donors, including individual supporters, corporate partners, and even groups of students. Their generosity allows WWP to provide free, life-changing programs and services to injured veterans, their caregivers, and family members. Recently, Flightstar, which maintains aircraft frames, organized a charity golf tournament to support WWP.

"Many of our employees, their family members, or their friends have served in the military," said Amy Bumgarner, Flightstar service department business manager. "This connection to our service members was a large part of choosing a cause to receive support through our annual golf outing. We love the work Wounded Warrior Project does."

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SEATTLE, June 29, 2017 -- One of the major challenges many wounded veterans face when returning to civilian life is maintaining a healthy and active lifestyle. That's why Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) hosts physical health and wellness expos around the nation, not just to get warriors moving again but to connect them with other local warriors who share their life experiences.

"Even though I may be nervous about meeting new people in the beginning, I quickly feel at home and at ease when I am around other veterans," said Army veteran Charlene Reilley. "Even if they are a different branch, we can all still relate in some way or another and have fun being ourselves. We can push each other to improve and be resilient. Once I got out of the Army, I stopped working out daily, for the most part. I would hike, kayak, and walk my dog, but nothing like the daily physical training first thing in the morning in the service. I ended up gaining weight and found myself being more stressed in a negative way – my temper got shorter and shorter." 

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