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We serve through free, life-changing programs.

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We empower warriors to live life to the fullest.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 12_Year_Old_Entrepreneur_Gives_His_Support_to_Wounded_Warrior_Project.jpg

    12-Year-Old Entrepreneur Gives His Support To Wounded Warrior Project

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 13, 2017 -- Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) relies on the support of donors, including individual supporters, corporate partners, and even groups of students. Young entrepreneur Matt Revnew recently reached out to WWP. His business, Maverick Men's, sells hair pomade for men. He stated his intentions to donate proceeds from the sales of his products to support those WWP serves.

    "I wanted to have a better hair product to use," Matt said. "I had the idea in May of 2017 and didn't put it into action until about July of 2017 when I went to an entrepreneur camp at a local high school. I plan on seeing it grow immensely from the time of October 2017 to February 2018."

    Like many who have chosen to support WWP, Matt has family who served in the military. His grandfather, Gerald, served in the Air Force during the Korean War. His uncle, Bob, saw combat in Desert Storm.

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    Veterans Experience Waves Of Fun With Wounded Warrior Project

    TEMPE, Ariz., Oct. 13, 2017 -- Even though Arizona has no ocean coastline, veterans and their families recently had the opportunity to master the art of surfing in Tempe thanks to Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP).

    WWP partnered with Big Surf to offer veterans and their families five weeks of surf sessions. While surfing is often recognized for its physical health benefits, it also promotes mental health by offering warriors the opportunity to connect with fellow service members. All WWP connection events support the long-term recovery of warriors by providing a chance to build lasting support structures.

    Army veteran Jesus Ibarra said he always wanted to surf. Not only did he fulfill his dream, but he also met other service members who can relate to his struggles.

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    Warriors Discover New Path To Recovery During Rock Hill Soldier Ride

    ROCK HILL, S.C., Oct. 11, 2017 -- Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) Soldier Ride®, presented by USAA®, continued its roll across America to serve another community of wounded warriors. In South Carolina, over 40 warriors hit the road and began building a local network of veterans that can provide critical support on the path to recovery.

    Army veteran Triron James showed up for the ride to get more than just a workout on the bicycle underneath him.

    "I wanted to link up with other veterans and get that sense of unity back," Triron said. "I came out here hoping to challenge myself physically, but also to learn more life skills and build a network with other veterans in my community. We all have that service history in common, but it's surprising how quickly everyone has come together. Everything comes back together to give us that sense of unity. We're all motivating each other, supporting each other. I needed that, and I need it in my day-to-day life."

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    Warrior Couples Find Healing, Connection At WWP Mental Health Workshops

    DALLAS, Oct. 11, 2017 -- Warrior couples from across the nation regularly attend Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) multi-day mental health workshops that are held regionally. These gatherings are often the first time warriors leave their homes as couples to connect with other veterans and the local community.

    "I'm not the same person that I used to be," said Marc Harrington, U.S. Army National Guard (ANG) wounded warrior from Louisville, Texas. Marc and his wife, Brittnay, were married in 2015. She is also an injured veteran who served in the ANG. She introduced Marc to WWP after he returned from his last deployment and learned that he was to be medically retired due to his injuries. "My invisible wounds have impacted my family and marriage. I don't want to just hang out. And when I'm upset – I don't want to talk it out. I walk away. Eighty percent of the time, I'm secluding myself from life."

    Through the generous support of donors, WWP offers veterans specialized mental health programs and services – tailored to each warrior's specific needs and free of charge.

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    10 Ways You Can Support Wounded Warrior Project

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla., Oct. 6, 2017 -- There's a lot of resources that go into serving over 100,000 wounded warriors, their family members, and caregivers. Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) is able to provide free programs and services and meet the needs of those we serve, because of donors like you. But for those who are unsure about how they can support WWP, there are many ways to get involved. 

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