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FAQs

We are pleased to report that based on our FY 2015 IRS Form 990, more than $262 million ($262,468,529) went to our life-saving free programs, a 38 percent increase in spend from FY 2014.

This is the third consecutive year that the amount of money spent on programs for warriors has increased.

Program spend represented 75 percent of our total expenses.

We are pleased to report that based on our FY 2015 IRS Form 990, our administrative spend decreased by 4 percent for a total spend of $14 million.

Administrative spend represented 4 percent of our total expenses.

Our investment in fundraising totaled $75 million, which represented 21 percent of our total expenses, and helped WWP raise over $372 million.

We invest in fundraising because all of the programs and services we provide are completely free to the warriors, families and caregivers we serve. In FY 2015, we invested 21 percent of our total expenses into fundraising, which totaled $75 million. This successfully generated over $372 million to fund those free programs and services.

For every $1 we invest in fundraising we raise approximately $5, this is $4 more that we have to invest in programs for warriors. This enables us to continue to provide warriors and their family with the free services and care they need with their rehabilitation and transition into the community.

As an example, our fundraising enabled us to launch Warrior Care Network, a mental health care program which requires a $70 million commitment over 3 years. With hundreds of warriors, their family members and caregivers registering monthly with WWP, the need for our programs and services is overwhelming and continuing to grow. We made a commitment to help these warriors, their family members, and caregivers for a lifetime; and the only way to ensure we can follow through on this promise is to ask the American public to support these warriors and their families.

Beginning this year, Wounded Warrior Project will use our IRS Form 990 to report financial information. The IRS Form 990 is referred to more frequently by donors, other charitable groups, charity watch groups and the public. This shift will align conversations on charity financials and allow us to focus on the impact of our programs and how we serve the warriors and families we exist to help. As required, we will still file audited financials and as always, they are available on our website.

Our consolidated financial statements have different reporting requirements than an IRS Form 990. Program expense in our financial statements includes gift in-kind donated services, including Public Service Announcements (PSA). PSA’s are donated advertising that does not have any donation ask, provides education on our programs, and encourages warriors to contact us for support. Gift in-kind donated services reduce the amount of money that WWP would have to pay out of pocket to serve warriors. If WWP did not receive these donated services, we would have to pay for them. The IRS Form 990 does not include in-kind donated services. The IRS Form 990 does recognize tangible in-kind donated products like gym memberships. 

Program expense in our consolidated audited financial statements does not include funds directed to the Long-Term Support Trust. The trust sets aside funds to ensure care and support services continue for the most seriously wounded service members upon the loss of their caregiver, so they can maintain their independence in their home, instead of being placed in a nursing home or other institution. To date, there has not been a need to distribute money from the Long-Term Support Trust to a warrior due to the loss of their caregiver. The consolidated audited financial statements will recognize the Long-Term Support Trust as a program expense when the money is distributed from the trust to support a warrior.

Raising awareness is essential to educating the public about the needs of this generation of wounded veterans.  WWP’s outreach initiatives are designed to educate injured service members about the free programs available to them through WWP, encourage the public to refer veterans to the organization, and spread awareness around the issues facing veterans and their families.  WWP performs outreach in several ways, including through donated programmatic media and educational messaging that it incorporates into its fundraising solicitations. 

For example, each year WWP surveys its Alumni, collecting responses from thousands of this generation's injured service members.  We use these responses not only to better tailor our programs, but to inform the public about warriors’ changing needs and challenges.  Because we often incorporate this educational messaging into fundraising solicitations, WWP allocates a portion of these costs to both program services and fundraising.  This is in accordance with guidelines from the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the Internal Revenue Service.