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YOUR JOURNEY
YOUR JOURNEY

Transitioning from military to civilian life is a journey, and that journey is different for every veteran. We offer a wide range of free programs and services to support you no matter what your journey looks like.

YOUR COMMUNITY
YOUR COMMUNITY

Affected by your service on or after September 11, 2001? We can help. Physical or invisible, your needs matter and we have a community of donors, partners, employees and fellow warriors to make sure you’re not alone.

YOUR FUTURE
YOUR FUTURE

Each day, our warriors set ambitious goals and we celebrate their accomplishments. Where do you see yourself? Together we'll get you there because you have a bright future to look forward to.

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“If I can be a part of an organization that helps people heal and find peace, then the end of my service is not the end. I’m just serving in a new way now.”

TANIKI RICHARD
Wounded Warrior

MAKE AN IMPACT

By donating, fundraising, or spreading the word, you can help our warriors get back on track and become a positive force in their communities.

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“There are so many wounded veterans out there who need help and support. The more people who help, the more motivated I get to be a better person.”

JAMES RIVERA
Wounded Warrior

WHAT'S NEW AT WWP

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TAKE ACTION: The House of Representatives Moves to Vote on H.R.3504 — Ryan Kules and Paul Benne Specially Adaptive Housing Improvement Act of 2019

By Retired Army Capt. Ryan Kules — Combat Stress Recovery Director, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP)

I was a 24-year-old U.S. Army armor captain deployed to Taji, Iraq, when my life changed forever. On Nov. 29, 2005, the vehicle I was in was struck by an improvised explosive device. I lost two of my soldiers, Sgts. Jerry Mills and Donald Hasse, and I lost my right arm and left leg.

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Wounded Warrior Project Discusses COVID-19 Financial Impact on Veterans During Washington Post Live Forum

WASHINGTON, June 26, 2020 -- During a recent Washington Post Live event, Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) experts discussed the challenges facing veterans during their military-to-civilian transitions, especially in the areas of employment and VA benefits.

"There are numerous challenges that our nation's warriors face with transitions to civilian life," said WWP Financial Wellness Vice President Tom Kastner. "We encourage those veterans to seek aid from veteran service organizations. Communities should continue to welcome veterans with access to local resources and help settle them into the workforce and new neighborhoods."

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Survey Shows Continuing Increase in Post-9/11 Veterans with PTSD

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., June 26, 2020 -- An increasing number of post-9/11 wounded veterans are living with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to the annual Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) survey of the veterans it serves.

The organization's latest survey reveals that 83% report living with PTSD, which is the highest reported percentage in the survey's 10-year history and an increase of 5% from the previous year.

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10 Tips to Help Warriors Cope with PTSD

JACKSONVILLE, Fla., June 22, 2020 -- In 2018, the U.S. Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) treated more than 1.7 million veterans for mental health issues, including combat stress, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The agency's National Center for PTSD reports that about 11% to 20% of veterans who served in Operations Iraqi or Enduring Freedom experience PTSD in a given year.

Still, some veterans are left undiagnosed and untreated. Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) believes it is imperative to raise PTSD awareness and highlight mental health services and resources available to wounded warriors.

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World-Class Athletes Support Wounded Warriors Through Virtual Event

Just before she left to compete at the London 2012 Olympic Games, American diver Kelci Bryant Grisez met with a group of injured military veterans. The experience left an indelible mark.

“I knew that I was competing and some of those heroes were at home watching, and I wanted to make them proud of someone they fought for,” Kelci said.

If they were watching recently, they would’ve been proud again. Kelci, along with more than a dozen of the world’s best female athletes, participated in a virtual trivia night to raise support for Wounded Warrior Project® (WWP) warriors and their families.

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